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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
civilians. the strike hit a suspected taliban hideouts. most of the dead were women and children. california police say they believe former los angeles police officer christopher dorner has died in a final standoff in the snowy mountains of big bear. a suspect believed to be dorner took refuge in a cabin after a car chase. a single gunshot was reportedly heard from within the cabin before it erupted in flames. officers are now testing the dead body recovered from the site to confirm they have dorner's remains. the shares deputy was killed in the gunfight between police and dorner, bringing his victims to four. >> he abandoned his vehicle, fled on foot into the forest, barricaded himself in a cabin, and at that time, there was an exchange of fire between law enforcement personnel outside the cabin and the suspect inside. after that fight, two that the sheriffs were shot. one of them died after being taken to loma linda. the second is in surgery and is expected to survive. >> this would end a manhunt after dorner promised to exact revenge on the lapd after his firing in 2008. the senate armed
and the ability to threaten the united states going forward. >> rose: dow consider the taliban among them. >> let me get that. we consider those groups, obviously a threat to the united states. they're the groups that we are in a conflict with, authorized by the authorization for use of military force by the congress and those are the groups against which we run our efforts primarily around, in afghanistan. in south asia, and in other parts of the world. that's the focus of the united states effort because those are the groups that threaten the united states. what president karzai is saying and we are moving to implement that decisions, in support of this, he is saying that afghans should provide for the core security in afghanistan. that they should be in the lead focused against the insurgency which threatens the afghan government. that's the taliban. >> right. >> and but that's what we're training in supporting and resourcing the afghans to do. and so very importantly, this may, may of 2013, 2013, the mission, the focus of the u.s. forces and the isap forces, the international forces working w
enough after the united states leaves to with stan the taliban and the taliban is able to gain somewhat approaching the power they had previously when they had power, that they would welcome al-qaeda back. >> well, you know, one of the big questions that has not been answered by the president's advisors is what's the american military presence going to be after 2014. in the state of the union, he said we'll be down basically by half a year from now. there are 66,000 now. at the end of the february next year it will be 32,000. but what happens after 2014 when the so-called war is over and there are a whole number of options on the table, anywhere i'd say from 3,000 troops to 10,000 troops or 9,000 troops. and also the capabilities that could be kept in the country from the u.s. side counterterrorism error and all that. so i think what military posture the u.s. agrees to keep in after 2014, and that will effect what nato agrees to do, are the non-u.s. part of nato i think will have a big effect what happens in afghanistan in terms of this question. we should be able to preclude that if th
iraq and now 12 years later we're not sure what our mission is. is our mission to eliminate taliban? that never was our mission. is it nation building? um, is it sending children to school? is it building sewer systems? is it going after al-queda? all those factors are complicated, but they have to be carefully thought through. (instrumental music) >> economic interests have always played a significant role in u.s. interventions around the globe. >> i would argue that the strategic interests are more obvious than the economic ones, although if you look closely enough you'll find that the two are almost inextricably intertwined. if you look at all interventions that the united states has engaged in from kosovo, to bosnia, to somalia, uh, to libya, to iraq, for that matter, you will find an economic component. >> maintaining access to certain markets, most often oil, is a common consideration. the u.s. drove iraq out of kuwait in the 1991 gulf war not just to protect its ally from foreign belligerence, but to protect the flourishing oil trade as well. >> i'll give you an example where
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)